How I Do The Wim Hof Method: Cold Exposure

Bryan Winchell
5 min readJan 23, 2022

Note: This is part three of a three-part series where an average, middle-aged dude — me — tells you my step-by-step method for how I do each of the three aspects of the Wim Hof Method. Part one was about the breathing technique and part two was focused on meditation. This post is about cold exposure.

This cold shower would work for the Wim Hof Method. (Photo by Jorge Fernández on Unsplash)

I’ve got four layers on, a scarf around my neck, two hoodies covering up my baseball cap and I’m still freakin’ cold. Such is the life of a night-time bike ride in mid-January on the central island of Japan.

“Thank you, cold,” I force myself to say.

The chill in my bones is nothing that some heavy riding encouraged by some up-tempo music like my boys the Disco Biscuits provide on the regular can’t solve. So I put on a Biscuits playlist on my earbuds and off I go…

15 minutes later and once again, I’m reminded: Yes, this is why I like winter. What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger and of all four seasons, none come close to winter for making us stronger.

And that’s why, despite it logically seeming like a bad idea, I continue to take my cold showers on these cold days. Below, I’ll explain exactly how I do it.

I wonder if Camus would have done the Wim Hof Method?

My Step-By-Step Process For Taking a Cold Shower

Before I begin, let me be clear. The cold showers in winter are not an easy thing to do. Thus, I tell people that while it’s extremely admirable to start taking them during the coldest season, I’m not going to knock you for waiting until it’s warmer. After all, I began the Wim Hof Method in May 2019 and had a whole summer and fall to get used to the cold showers.

Having said that, Wim Hof here will explain to you why starting now is the best way to improve the results from cold exposure.

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Bryan Winchell

A Serious Fool who writes about: Personal/collective growth, politics, love of Nature/Humanity, Japan, podcasting, humor, and being a hippie in Service to Life.